Gigabit Community Fund

Next-generation networks with the power to transform learning.

What is Mozilla Gigabit?

The Mozilla Gigabit Community Fund provides grant funding in select U.S. communities to support pilot tests of gigabit technologies such as virtual reality, 4K video, artificial intelligence, and their related curricula. In so doing, our goal is to increase participation in technology innovation in support of a healthy Internet where all people are empowered, safe, and independent online.

The Gigabit Approach

Our approach to taking gigabit discoveries out of the lab and into the field is threefold:

Fund and Support

We support the development of gigabit applications and associated curricula through the Gigabit Community Fund. Grants support pilots that take gigabit technologies out of the lab and into learning spaces in select cities across the United States.

Innovate and Spread

We catalyze the creation, adoption, and spread of these innovations through Hive Learning Networks. Hives are a local network of teachers, informal educators, technologists, and community members working together to advance the promise of the web for learning.

Scale and Grow

We leverage Mozilla’s national networks to share these successes across Hive cities, other gigabit cities, and beyond. Our open innovation practices facilitate the adoption of gigabit technologies by diverse new communities of users.

Where are Mozilla Gigabit Cities

Get in touch with your local Gigabit Hive community

Featured Updates

CERN+KC Gigabit Challenge

A citizen science project leveraging gigabit capacity to support CERN's Large Hadron Collider and provide science and technology lessons.

Kansas City
2017

The Gigabit Advantage

Until today, volunteer computing projects, including LHC@Home, have been restricted to problems requiring heavy computing loads with minimal data movement. This is because almost all volunteers have slow or expensive data connections. For LHC@home this has restricted the possible type of calculation to event simulation. But the CERN experiments also require event analysis and event reconstruction calculations which involve heavy data movement. With the advent of Gigabit connections to homes and schools, CERN would like to run a pilot in Kansas City to measure the effectiveness of the CERN Volunteer Cloud running a fuller range of physics calculations. In addition to educating students on the physics research being done at CERN and providing the opportunity to engage in a citizen science activity, the curriculum will also help them understand the power of the gigabit internet connection that exists in Kansas City.

Outcomes

Learn more about CERN+KC Gigabit Challenge

Gigabit Events

We offer global and local opportunities that facilitate group and in-person collaboration. Join us!

July 25, 2017

Mozilla/NSF WINS San Francisco Meet-Up

Mozilla's San Francisco Office - 2 Harrison St, San Francisco, CA 94105

Mozilla and the National Science Foundation are partnering to give away $2M in prizes for wireless solutions that help connect the unconnected. Full details at wirelesschallenge.mozilla.org. This meet-up will cover the WINS Challenges, and includes a panel of local community wireless networking experts and an opportunity to network with others interested in the Challenges.

August 1-3, 2017

Gigabit City Summit

Plexpod Westport Commons - 300 E 39th St, Kansas City, MO 64111

The 2017 Gigabit City Summit goes beyond the smart city hype to prepare cities to pursue sustainable community change models. Powered by KC Digital Drive, the event explores opportunities for investing in a tech-capable infrastructure and the steps needed to continue to grow and evolve.

October 27-29, 2017

MozFest

Ravensbourne College, London

Join the Mozilla Foundation's annual festival and be part of the global network fighting to keep the web open and free.